Unthinkable: An Extraordinary Journey Through the World’s Strangest Brains

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Ecco #ad - We take it for granted that we can remember, empathise and understand the world around us, feel emotion, but how would our lives change if these abilities were dramatically enhanced – or disappeared overnight? Helen Thomson has spent years travelling the world, navigate, tracking down incredibly rare brain disorders.

An amazon best nonfiction book of the monthindiebound Bestseller Award-winning science writer Helen Thomson unlocks the biggest mysteries of the human brain by examining nine extraordinary casesOur brains are far stranger than we think. Discover how to forge memories that never disappear, how to grow an alien limb and how to make better decisions.

Unthinkable: An Extraordinary Journey Through the World's Strangest Brains #ad - Think the unthinkable. From the man who thinks he's a tiger to the doctor who feels the pain of others just by looking at them to a woman who hears music that’s not there, in some cases, their experiences illustrate how the brain can shape our lives in unexpected and, brilliant and alarming ways. In unthinkable she tells the stories of nine extraordinary people she encountered along the way.

Find out how to avoid getting lost, how to see more of your reality, even how exactly you can confirm you are alive. Learn how to hallucinate and how to make yourself happier in a split second. Story by remarkable story, Unthinkable takes us on an unforgettable journey through the human brain.

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The Ends of the World: Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth's Past Mass Extinctions

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Ecco #ad - Brannen examines the fossil record—which is rife with creatures like dragonflies the size of sea gulls and guillotine-mouthed fish—and introduces us to the researchers on the front lines who, using the forensic tools of modern science, are piecing together what really happened at the crime scenes of the Earth’s biggest whodunits.

Part road trip, the ends of the world takes us on a tour of the ways that our planet has clawed itself back from the grave, part history, and part cautionary tale, and casts our future in a completely new light. New york times editors' choice 2017forbes top 10 best environment, climate, and conservation book of 2017as new groundbreaking research suggests that climate change played a major role in the most extreme catastrophes in the planet's history, smothered, frozen, offers us a glimpse of our increasingly dangerous future Our world has ended five times: it has been broiled, poison-gassed, award-winning science journalist Peter Brannen takes us on a wild ride through the planet's five mass extinctions and, in the process, and pelted by asteroids.

The Ends of the World: Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth's Past Mass Extinctions #ad - . In the ends of the world, peter brannen dives into deep time, exploring Earth’s past dead ends, and in the process, offers us a glimpse of our possible future. Many scientists now believe that the climate shifts of the twenty-first century have analogs in these five extinctions. Using the visible clues these devastations have left behind in the fossil record, ” from South Africa to the New York Palisades, The Ends of the World takes us inside “scenes of the crime, to tell the story of each extinction.

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Borrowed Time: The Science of How and Why We Age Bloomsbury Sigma

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Bloomsbury Sigma #ad - In borrowed time, sue armstrong tells the story of science's quest to understand ageing and to prevent or delay the crippling conditions so often associated with old age. Sometime before 2020, be greater than the number of 0–4 year olds, the number of people over 65 worldwide will, for the first time, and it will keep on rising.

There are a myriad competing theories, like well-worn shoes or a rusting car, from the idea that our bodies simply wear out with the rough and tumble of living, to the belief that ageing and death are genetically programmed and controlled. She focusses inward – on what is going on in our bodies at the most basic level of the cells and genes as the years pass – to look for answers to why and how our skin wrinkles with age, our wounds take much longer to heal than they did when we were kids, and why words escape us at crucial moments in conversation.

Borrowed Time: The Science of How and Why We Age Bloomsbury Sigma #ad - This book explores these questions and many others through interviews with key scientists in the field of gerontology and with people who have interesting and important stories to tell about their personal experiences of ageing. As featured on bbc radio 4's start the week'a rich, timely study for the era of "global ageing"' NatureThe ageing of the world population is one of the most important issues facing humanity in the 21st century – up there with climate change in its potential global impact.

But why and how do we age? Scientists have been asking this question for centuries, yet there is still no agreement. The strains this is causing on society are already evident as health and social services everywhere struggle to cope with the care needs of the elderly.

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Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas Jefferson and Emily Dickinson

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HarperOne #ad - This is an account of the world's greatest ‘intellectual virtuosos, eastern critical wisdom, roman stoicism, jesus, to modern secular equivalents marx, ' who are also humanity's greatest doubters and disbelievers, Marx, This remarkable book ranges from the early Greeks, medieval Islamic, Gnosticism and Christian mystics, Freud, from the ancient Greek philosophers, modern and contemporary critical thinkers such as Schopenhauer, Jesus as a man of doubt, and the Eastern religions, Freud and Darwin—and their attempts to reconcile the seeming meaninglessness of the universe with the human need for meaning, secularism, Nietzsche, Darwin, the rise of science, Hebrew figures such as Job and Ecclesiastes, Jewish and Christian skeptics, the existentialists.

Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas Jefferson and Emily Dickinson #ad - In the tradition of grand sweeping histories such as from dawn to decadence, hecht champions doubt and questioning as one of the great and noble, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, and A History of God, if unheralded, intellectual traditions that distinguish the Western mind especially-from Socrates to Galileo and Darwin to Wittgenstein and Hawking.

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Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History

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Algonquin Books #ad - As he examines these close encounters of the cannibal kind, Bill Schutt makes the ick-factor fascinating. With unexpected wit and a wealth of knowledge, dissecting exciting new research and investigating questions such as why so many fish eat their offspring and some amphibians consume their mother's skin; why sexual cannibalism is an evolutionary advantage for certain spiders; why, American Museum of Natural History zoologist Bill Schutt takes us on a tour of the field, until the end of the eighteenth century, British royalty ate human body parts; how cannibalism may be linked to the extinction of Neanderthals; why microbes on sacramental bread may have led to execution of Jews by Catholics in the Middle Ages.

Today, but be forewarned: as climate change progresses and humans see more famine, fiction, and the occasional psychopath, the subject of humans consuming one another has been relegated to the realm of horror movies, disease, and overcrowding, biological and cultural constraints may well disappear. Eating one's own kind is completely natural behavior in thousands of species, including humans.

Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History #ad - Throughout history we have engaged in cannibalism for reasons of famine, burial rites, and medicinal remedies; it's been used as a way to terrorize and even a way to show filial piety. These are the very factors that lead to outbreaks of cannibalism.

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The Disordered Mind: What Unusual Brains Tell Us About Ourselves

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - Kandel, the winner of the nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine for his foundational research into memory storage in the brain, is one of the pioneers of modern brain science. The brain processes that give rise to our mind can become disordered, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, resulting in diseases such as autism, addiction, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

. He confronts one of the most difficult questions we face: How does our mind, our individual sense of self, emerge from the physical matter of the brain? The brain’s 86 billion neurons communicate with one another through very precise connections. But sometimes those connections are disrupted. His work continues to shape our understanding of how learning and memory work and to break down age-old barriers between the sciences and the arts.

In his seminal new book, the disordered Mind, Kandel draws on a lifetime of pathbreaking research and the work of many other leading neuroscientists to take us on an unusual tour of the brain. A nobel prize–winning neuroscientist’s probing investigation of what brain disorders can tell us about human natureEric R.

The Disordered Mind: What Unusual Brains Tell Us About Ourselves #ad - While these disruptions bring great suffering, they can also reveal the mysteries of how the brain produces our most fundamental experiences and capabilities—the very nature of what it means to be human. Studies of autism illuminate the neurological foundations of our social instincts; research into depression offers important insights on emotions and the integrity of the self; and paradigm-shifting work on addiction has led to a new understanding of the relationship between pleasure and willpower.

By studying disruptions to typical brain functioning and exploring their potential treatments, behavior, we will deepen our understanding of thought, memory, feeling, and creativity.

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Vaccinated: Triumph, Controversy, and An Uncertain F

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HarperCollins e-books #ad - Born into the life of a montana chicken farmer, the pharmaceutical company, and eventually joined Merck, Hilleman ran off to the University of Chicago to become a microbiologist, to pursue his goal of eliminating childhood disease. Vaccinated is not a biography; hilleman's experience forms the basis for a rich and lively narrative of two hundred years of medical history, ranging across the globe and throughout time to take in a cast of hundreds, all caught up, intentionally or otherwise, in the story of vaccines.

He made it his life's work to see that others could do the same. Paul offit clearly and compellingly rebuts those arguments, and, by demonstrating how much the work of Hilleman and others has gained for humanity, shows us how much we have to lose. Chief among his accomplishments are nine vaccines that practically every child gets, rendering formerly dread diseases—including often devastating ones such as mumps and rubella—practically toothless and nearly forgotten; his measles vaccine alone saves several million lives every year.

Vaccinated: Triumph, Controversy, and An Uncertain F #ad - Maurice hilleman's mother died a day after he was born and his twin sister stillborn. It is an inspiring and triumphant tale, but one with a cautionary aspect, as vaccines come under assault from people blaming vaccines for autism and worse. As an adult, he said that he felt he had escaped an appointment with death.

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Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion-Dollar Trash Trade

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Bloomsbury Press #ad - What emerges is an engaging, colorful, and sometimes troubling tale of how the way we consume and discard stuff brings home the ascent of a developing world that recognizes value where Americans don't. Along the way, we meet an international cast of characters who have figured out how to squeeze Silicon Valley-scale fortunes from what we all throw away.

In junkyard planet, often hidden, adam minter-veteran journalist and son of an American junkyard owner-travels deeply into a vast, 500-billion-dollar industry that's transforming our economy and environment. Minter takes us from back-alley Chinese computer recycling operations to recycling factories capable of processing a jumbo jet's worth of trash every day.

Junkyard planet reveals that Americans might need to learn a smarter way to take out the trash. Junkyard planet reveals how “going green” usually means making money-and why that's often the most sustainable choice, even when the recycling methods aren't pretty. With unmatched access to and insight on the waste industry, and the explanatory gifts and an eye for detail worthy of a John McPhee or William Langewiesche, Minter traces the export of America's garbage and the massive profits that China and other rising nations earn from it.

Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion-Dollar Trash Trade #ad - How can garbage turn into gold? what does recycling have to do with globalization? where does all that stuff we throw away go, anyway? When you drop your Diet Coke can or yesterday's newspaper in the recycling bin, where does it go? Probably halfway around the world, to people and places that clean up what you don't want and turn it into something you can't wait to buy.

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Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms,and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories

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HarperCollins e-books #ad - A gifted storyteller and consummate historian, Winchester sets the great blue sea's epic narrative against the backdrop of mankind's intellectual evolution, telling not only the story of an ocean, but the story of civilization. Variably genial, travel, cautionary, terrifying, reading, admonitory, lyrical, horrifying and inspiring…A lifetime of thought, imagination and memory inform this affecting account.

Kirkus reviews starred reviewblending history and anecdote, geography and reminiscence, science and exposition, New York Times bestselling author Simon Winchester tells the breathtaking saga of the Atlantic Ocean. Fans of winchester's krakatoa, and the professor and the Madman will love this masterful, penetrating, The Man Who Loved China, and resonant tale of humanity finding its way across the ocean of history.

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and Your Life - Activate Your Brain: How Understanding Your Brain Can Improve Your Work

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Greenleaf Book Group Press #ad - A wall street journal bestseller!axiom business book bronze award winnerpush your brain to full power, for success at the office and at homeWould you like more control over your life and your work?Would you like greater stamina as you carry out your daily tasks?How about more significance and meaning as you move forward in your career?Scott Halford shows us how we can all find these things if we simply understand how to activate the full potential of the brain.

We just have to recognize how the brain works, and understand the actions we can take to help it perform at its best. Combining research, anecdote, and inspiration, Activate Your Brain shows you how small steps toward better brain function and management can eventually lead to success on a whole new level.

and Your Life - Activate Your Brain: How Understanding Your Brain Can Improve Your Work #ad - . Increase your focus, •collaborate effectively with others, •build self-confidence and willpower, •manage distractions, •reduce negative stress, •and much more. In the end, activate your brain is an indispensable collection of practical things you need to know about your wonderful brain—which, when fully harnessed, can give you more of the fulfilled life you seek.

. Each chapter offers “Activations”—exercises that help optimize your brain function to. This incredible organ is still full of mystery, but we know enough to harness its power better than ever before.

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The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil

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Random House #ad - Like hannah arendt’s eichmann in jerusalem and Steven Pinker’s The Blank Slate, The Lucifer Effect is a shocking, engrossing study that will change the way we view human behavior. An extraordinarily valuable addition to the literature of the psychology of violence or ‘evil. The american Prospect “Penetrating.

All politicians and social commentators. Combining a dense but readable and often engrossing exposition of social psychology research with an impassioned moral seriousness, Zimbardo challenges readers to look beyond glib denunciations of evil-doers and ponder our collective responsibility for the world’s ills.

Publishers Weekly “A sprawling discussion. He replaces the long-held notion of the “bad apple” with that of the “bad barrel”—the idea that the social setting and the system contaminate the individual, rather than the other way around. While forcing us to reexamine what we are capable of doing when caught up in the crucible of behavioral dynamics, though, Zimbardo also offers hope.

The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil #ad - . Within a week the study was abandoned, as ordinary college students were transformed into either brutal, sadistic guards or emotionally broken prisoners. The lucifer effect explains how—and the myriad reasons why—we are all susceptible to the lure of “the dark side. Drawing on examples from history as well as his own trailblazing research, Zimbardo details how situational forces and group dynamics can work in concert to make monsters out of decent men and women.

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